the limits of cork lining

Proust famously had his bedroom cork-lined to keep out the noise of his neighbours. Eric Packer, in DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, has his limo cork-lined, too.
 
I’ve been musing that focus, concentration, analytical tasks can shut out the world around, but the slower, divergent thinking needed for creativity can’t – there’s more on the research on this in my post wandering from the path. The thought was triggered by a concrete mixer outside my workshop doors. The builder’s boss, Mr Klim, got them to move it a bit further away, which was great, but it was hard to think about making new pots, new glazes with all the distraction.
 
It’s made me begrudgingly come round to the idea of artistic temperament – the frustration that comes as a result of trying to take the ‘slow path’ in a world that’s often about speeding up. With some notable exceptions, like a parsonage in Howarth.
 
So I took Natalie Goldberg‘s advice – lolling about on a sofa’s key to having new ideas – and went home to bake a cake: a depression cake, or crazy cake, appropriately, from the fabulous blog The Quince Tree. And the cake was great. A surprise, as it’s got vinegar in it.
 
Luckily, in ceramics, there’s also always straightforward tasks: loading kilns, packing work, so there are still some pots for me to share.
Carys Davies porcelain pot
Carys Davies porcelain pot
Carys Davies porcelain pot
Carys Davies porcelain pot
Carys Davies porcelain pot
Carys Davies porcelain pot
Carys Davies porcelain pot

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3 responses to “the limits of cork lining

  1. Creativity… yes, it awkwardly requires an oblique approach; the French word ‘glander’ is a useful one here I think: il faut glander… I see that we have both blogged about baking! For me, it is a comforting process, restoring order when life feels a little out of control, a low-level creativity which leaves my mind free to unravel the knots besetting it, and hopefully with the added bonus of supplying something delicious at the end.

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  2. There’s some research that hand-eye co-ordination tasks aid the move of data from short to long term memory… I think baking’s like that, makes you ‘mindful’, maybe, to use the fashionable term?
    PS Your spiced apple cake looks fab – I’m hoping to try it soon!

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  3. Pingback: fallow in the flood plain | carys davies porcelain·

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